A healthy forest is a community of life. People are members of that community.
Wildness is essential to the well-being of the whole forest community. Rotting logs, wind-felled trees, standing snags, large-diameter legacy trees—all are part of a healthy forest.
People can work in and harvest from the forest in ways that encourage its health and wildness—mutually beneficial relationship at its best.
Clean water. Clean air. Beauty. Firewood. Wildlife habitat. Peace and solitude. Timber. Maple syrup. Soul restoration. Carbon sequestration. Just a few of the gifts of a healthy, rewilding forest.

Illustration generously shared courtesy Wetland, Woodland, Wildland: A Guide to the Natural Communities of Vermont, 2005, Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department and The Nature Conservancy

Welcome to Vermont Family Forests

Everything our little organization does begins and ends with forest health. Whether we are meeting with a landowner to help them develop a forest conservation plan, or hosting a workshop on light-on-the-land forestry, or stoking the fires of engagement and conversation with pizzas baked in our wood-fired earth oven, we are guided by the intention to grow the health and wholeness of the forest community.

  • Where We Work

  • Consulting Forestry

  • Forestry Reimagined

The Latest Posts from Rewilding Happen(ing)s!:

A Spring Salamander’s Eye View of Forest Health

Spring salamanders need clear, cold, highly oxygenated, pesticide-free streams and springs. David Brynn explores how commoners can help.

VFF’s Abenaki Cultural Use Land Access Project: Mutually Beneficial Relationship in Action

With the help of Middlebury College students, VFF is launching a project to facilitate mutually beneficial access to private forestlands for Abenaki citizens.

The Ecological Disaster of Perpetual-Growth Economics

In this guest blog post, herpetologist Jim Andrews discusses the ecological impacts here at home wrought by our current economic model.

ALL POSTS

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